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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
the press" conversation. this week a focus on foreign policy. it didn't get much attention in the president's inaugural address, but as his second term is underway, there's certainly a lot of focus on some of the big areas that he will be occupied by when it comes to national security and the world. what are some of the big bets that president obama can make to cement his legacy abroad? joining me is martin indyk of the brookings institution, an assistant secretary of state for president clinton and also the author of "bending history, barack obama's foreign policy." i got to take part in a conversation of big bets, black swans, a presidential briefing where you and the team at brookings write about both some of the real dangers in foreign policy as well as some areas where the president can make an impact if he so chooses. there's a lot to digest including the fact a new secretary of state is going to be presumably confirmed by the senate, john kerry. and yet in the financial times as we do this interview it is hillary clinton and the questions she faced about the death of our ambassador a
relationships on behalf of the president's and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world, but lets me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you on the issues you have championed over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear pilogical and chemical weapons. fighting for human rights and against hiv/aids around the world. fighting crime, corruption, drug trafficking and stabding up as you always have for the interest of the foreign service around the world. in your new role, should you be confirmed and i know you will, you will be center stage, representing the interests of all of us, from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce and enhancing cross cultural ties and keeping america secure through cooperation where possi
. chris cillizza, the foreign policy, in many regards, has been run out of the white house, and perhaps even more so because mcdonagh, the deputy of national security director is going to be the next chief of staff. >> right. no reason to think that will change. andrea, look, we don't focus enough on foreign policy, but the challenges, we focus on the domestic challenges for barack obama, and as we talked about, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by th
surprising and perhaps not surprising many the speech in the last block, but i thought this foreign policy piece was one of the more surprising things he mentioned. insofar as it sounded like obama 1.0, the obama that was elected in 2008, who has since expanded the use of drones and extra judicial killings, who has had a very aggressive national security policy in place. i wondered what that meant, especially against the back drop of what is happening in the middle east, in syria, and algeria, and mali. what was your read on it? >> but has also, to be fair to president obama, ended the iraq war and begun the drive out of the afghanistan war. one of the really interesting things about the second term, we talked in the first segment about all of the issues of medicare and social security. anything there has to go through a republican house. >> right. >> creating obama's foreign policy does not, for the most part, and we can argue about congressional authority, but presidents have wide latitude on foreign policy, and his appointments on the foreign policy side in chuck hagel and to some lesse
of the president and the furtherance of american foreign policy. i'll have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as the team of the world, but let me say, mr. chairman, it's been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you in the issues you've championed over the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear biological, chemical weapons, fighting for human rights and against hiv-aids around the world, fighting crime, corruption, drug trafficking and standing up, as you always have, for the interest of the foreign service around the world. in your role, should you will be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded, you will represent the interests of all of us, from securing our embassies and protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce, enhancing cross-cultural ties and keeping america secure through cooperation, where possible, and i
of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
and the further of american foreign policy. all have some questions later on policies and your views, including how you explain to world leaders how you could have been rooting for the boston red sox instead of what the world knows as the new york yankees as a team of the world, but let me say, mr. chairman, it has been a pleasure working with you and looking forward to continuing to work with you on the issues you're a champion of the years. fighting global terrorism, preventing the spread of nuclear biological chemical weapons, fighting for human rights and against hiv aids to a round the world. fighting crime corruption, drug trafficking, and standing up, as you always have, for the interest of foreign service around the world. in your new role, should you be confirmed, and i know you will, your portfolio will be greatly expanded, center stage representing the interest of all this from securing our embassies in protecting our overseas personnel to promoting commerce and enhancing cross cultural ties and keeping american security corporation where possible and isolation where necessary as in
detachment has been his foreign policy hallm k hallmark. they are a catalyst present but not deeply involved. just to start you out on the huge threat of an iranian nuclear weapon, how does that factor into the second term? >> i think it's possible that this year there may be an action by israel against iran. it looked likely last year. i thought it was going to happen. and then it looked less likely. and people i'm speaking to think it is once again a possibility. that changes the entire dynamic. and this administration talks about wanting to shift to asia. sure, that sounds greatest. but i think it will be very difficult to do. especially in that happens. if the israelis decide after their elections that they are moving a little bit more to the right, if the iranian elections coming up bring that country even further to the right, it seems like some sort of clash is coming. that's just on the israel-iran. if you look -- broaden out a little bit, then you have syria, which is in state collapse, and is probably going to be in some sort of state of anarchy over the next few months. that will
white house. he has helped advise president obama on some of his key foreign policy decisions, including drawing down the troops in afghanistan, ending the war in iraq, and also responding to some of the natural disasters that have occurred in recent years, including haiti, and japan. he is someone who has built up a lot of trust here in the white house. you heard that today when president obama talked about him, talked about how much he meant to the staffers here. we should also mention he was pictured in the situation room during the raid on osama bin laden, so this is certainly someone who is very close to the president and will be a key figure moving forward with this white house. andrea. >> thank you so much, kristen welker. david gregory here and pete williams joining us as well. autowe've seen good chiefs of staff and bad. some of the best. jim bakker, ken duberstein, leon panetta in times of trouble. >> howard baker certainly rescuing the ronald reagan second term from don regan, a bad chief of staff by all accounts. what is the pluses and minuses of denis mcdonough. he knows the
in the president's attitude, certainly in his approach to foreign policy. you'll recall from the beginning of administration, the word engagement was, in fact, a guidepost for how we were going to try to deal with adversaries as well as in terms of how you try to deal with resolving conflict. so, i think engagement as such is not new. there's als been a premise to that engagement. it's engagement without illusion. the president has looked at iran as a country that is pursuing a nuclear weapons capability and he's made it clear his objective is to prevent that, not to live with it. his preferred approach is to resolve it through peaceful means, resolve it by engaging with iranians, getting ourselves and others to engage, but to get the iranians to change their objective. the end result may be preferably achieved through diplomacy but the implication is if diplomacy does not work, force may be likely. >> you listen to what the president said in terms of interpretation from israel, couple with what ma hud barack was saying, if that kind of back-channelling doesn't work. are we at odds with is
immediate. that is why we need political leaders who will make the case. on the campaign, foreign policy is different than domestic policy. you might have seen this people don't ask what do you think we should do abouts? what do you think about the second amendment? they ask you're going protect my second amendment rights, aren't you? they ask that about libya and afghanistan. we experience the economy or the domestic policy first-hand in our churches, in our workplace. very few people including the people here in washington experience the world first-hand. there is more opportunity for leadership and persuasion in foreign policy than in domestic policy. unfortunately, our prosecutor does not try to make that case. >> on the subject of guns, i take it you're not a gun controller. do you regard any of president obama's proposals as reasonable? something that one should swallow? >> i think his proposals will be ineffective. i think they are provepbt to be ineffective of the assault weapons ban. there is no impact on crime in general or mass murderer in particular. there was an assault weap
the speech, however, briep, was the absence of foreign policy. and the two really contentious appointments, or at least one is chuck hagel who is going to run the defense department. and the middle east is aflame again and now we're seeing it spread into africa in a way that is very hard to get a fix for what the model is dealing with it. these are failed states. we have tribalism again prevailing in africa and again in the middle east because islamic rage has not been distinguished. command and control of al qaeda they believe has been broken down, but as you saw in algeria in the past several days, this is going to be a continuing problem out there. that will go to the defense department, how it's run, how much money they have to spend, how they reorganized the response of that and secretary kerry would is going to pick up the baton from hillary clinton has to decide what's our relationship with egypt? how run by a muslim brotherhood. >> it's worth remarking on that because four years ago, as we all sat here, none of us expected every assumption you would make about the middle east for d
to one another must be equally as well. >> reporter: foreign policy was noticeably absent from his address though he harolded a decade of war, touting a recovering economy and acknowledged the lessons still ahead. >> the commitments we make to each other, these things do not sap our nation. they strengthen us. >> reporter: he gave mitt romney this line. >> they do not make us a nation of tears. ♪ la >> reporter: filling the air what patriotism, kelly clarkson and beyonce. ♪ the brave there was a poem and prayers. as he left the west front of the capitol, a nostalgic turned back toward the lincoln memorial. >> i want to take a look out one more time. >> now there were shades of the campaign that the president winning out, success can't mean that a few people are making it and a growing number are barely scratching by. the president acknowledging that bipartisan -- or the lack of bipartisanship here in washington but noted that everyone needs to work together for the good of the country. john? >> dan, that moment at the end of your piece where the president turned around and look
. and i think that's really what he wants to do with the foreign policy is to move it in a new direction. >> it means he's going back to cairo. the speech he gave in june, 200 9d, he's going back to cairo. >> let's talk about that. let me talk about this. i think what i'm hearing from robin right, some real experts in the middle east. we may not be able to, but if we can, and they do proceed on it and once we attack them, we will never be able to talk them out of it. they will go back and do it again and again and again. if we go to war with them, it will be an unending struggle. we have a little time to talk them out of it. and i think that's what he's trying to send, this big message. to say you know what, i don't think cheney wanted peace. i think he wanted a war. but maybe this guy will give us something? that puts us in a position where we can say yes, we're not going to go nuclear. we're not going to do it. that's what they want. they want trade. they want economic opportunity. maybe they want to join the world. >> and the thing is, he's backed up these words by picking chuck hagel
ambitions. senator kerry took heat for president obama's foreign policy which he supports, but says time is running out for the regime. >> the president has made it definitive. we will do what we must do to prevent iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon and i repeat here today, our policy is not containment. it is prevention. and the clock is ticking on our efforts to secure responsible compliance. >> i hope you would help me with because in your testimony you alluded to president obama's vision for the world and the two years i've been here, i've struggled to fully understand what that vision is. >> on syria, another hot spot they'll face, senator kerry and senator mccain, a democrat and republican, said every day that goes by, it gets worse, shep. >> shepard: he was also, senator kerry, put into position to defend another of the president's cabinet nominees. >> that's right. his nomination is not controversial. he's well-known and plenty of experience and so he's expected to be a shoe in. but senator chuck hagel, the nominee to be the next secretary of defense has taken some heat and tod
more like the president thinks when it comes to foreign policy this will be a team that might not push back as much with regard to cuts or withdrawals or smaller footprints or reluctant moves with new eras. in terms of the worth of the man for him and the job they receive there, not at all. >> since you went there, let me sort of switch where i was going and ask you about the smaller footprint. we having coming up the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan at the end of the year, and we are seeing republicans already going, no, i think we need -- lindsay graham on, talked about up to 20,000. it's too important not to leave a substantial footprint there, and yet i think that the general is right that we now have a team that seems to be more in sync with president obama and they want a very small footprint. you talked in your book about training the afghan security forces, are they ready for a total withdrawal of u.s. troops when the time comes? >> i think they are not ready for lack of a strategic partnership in america. i wouldn't try to tell senior officers how many people
some key lines that might be a sign of what's to come in his second term foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like about president obama and one of the many reasons i like him, because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran? richard engel is
and cody keenan. ben rhodes usually takes the foreign policy side of things. jon favreau, he's usually most involved in this big vision. >> >> jennifer: he's like 31 years old. >> cody keenan also young. he always plays a hand in this. my guess would be -- i haven't spoken to favreau about this. he would be working on this closely with president obama. they do the speeches up until the last minute. on the nobel prize acceptance speech, obama came down from his hotel room with a copy of the speech, went to the fourth floor and gave changes to make on the way over to receive the speech. that could be going on right now. >> john: these guys write the speeches in terms of overview. they're there for structure and tone but it is the president himself who decides what the final content is going to be and who makes the revisions he needs to. how deep his editorial involvement is. >> jennifer: if you're going to be true to who you are, as president, you have to -- you have to have input on this. the language has to come from you, naturally. he's a good writer. obviously he's got significant opinion
, when it comes to foreign po policy. this is going to be a team that might not push back as much with regard to cuts or withdrawals or smaller footprints. so i think there may be differences in policy, but in terms of the worth of man for handling the job, they received there, not at all. >> since you went there, let me just switch where i was going and ask you about the smaller footprint. because we do have coming up, the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan, at the end of the year, and we are seeing republicans already going no, i think we had lindsay graham on, we talked about up to 20,000. it's too important not to leave a substantial footprint there. and yet i think the general is right, that we now have a team that seems to be more in sync with president obama and they want a very small footprint, you talked in your book. are they ready for a u.s. troop withdrawal when the time comes. >> i certainly wouldn't try to sell senior officers exactly how many people are required. but i think we have offered a strategic partnership to afghanistan. >> it means trust, an
. in that it was almost entirely about foreign policy. we would go anywhere, bear any price, pay any price, bear any burden to ensure the survival of liberty. this time, the president's foreign policy really was disspilled into seven words, a decade of war is now ending, the contrast of the last half century is striking. >> and jonathan karl who covers the white house for us, jon, i know you're in the capitol steps, the president saying we can't succumb to the fiction that all society's ills can be cured through government alone yet the bulk of the speech really praised and support and encouragement for all the things we do together through our government. >> george, i felt during much of that speech like i was listening to a democratic ronald reagan where reagan was unapologetically conservative. this was unapologetically progressive saying we must act collectively. and this was also bound with optimism saying america's possibilities are limitless. this was an effort, i believe, at that kind of optimistic progressivism whereas a reagan was your optimistic conservatism. also, i was very struck by on
of america now weighing a change to a policy against allowing openly gay members. if you thought the decade or so since 9/11 was bad, wait till you see the next ten years. we got a very grim warning from the british foreign secretary william haig. he's here in "the situation room."ve exactly how they want. with scottrade's online banking, i get one view of my bank and brokerage accounts with one login... to easily move my money when i need to. plus, when i call my local scottrade office, i can talk to someone who knows how i trade. because i don't trade like everybody. i trade like me. i'm with scottrade. (announcer) scottrade. awarded five-stars from smartmoney magazine. did you just turn your ringer off so no one would interrupt and.us?one. oh no, i... just used my geico app to get a tow truck. it's gonna be 30 minutes. oh, so that means that we won't be stuck up here, for hours, with nothing to do. oh i get it, you wanna pass the time, huh. (holds up phone) fruit ninja!!! emergency roadside assistance. just a click away with the geico mobile app. >>> after a wave of protests, a huge chan
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)

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